Once you become a doctor, it marks a turning point at which most doctors start slipping backwards. There’s a reason!
Your burning passion and rugged determination for your medical career goals is not enough to overcome the barriers to your planned and expected maximum success in medical practice. It’s a reality that you shouldn’t have to face, and that you don’t deserve.

There are reasons why and what you can do about it. It’s one of the most distressing, yet understandable, factors leading to career failure. The meaning of failure as used here is the complete inability of over 95% of doctors to reach their maximum potential as a doctor.

It also includes your inability to create and maintain a medical practice that will ever reach the profitability potential it has the capacity to foster. In clearer terms, unless you are prepared to do what needs to be done to reach those highest levels of accomplishments, you will fail to a significant degree.

The inability refers to the absence of training and education that are required to rise above the others. As a result you are effectively programmed to fail by the institution that qualified you to be a doctor.

Consider a few factors that lead you to this unholy position:
You have not been provided with the essential tools to run your medical practice business efficiently and profitably. It means you have no business or marketing training or education.

A challenge to your intellect and common sense:
Is it possible in our present economic environment to create a successful, constantly growing, medical practice business when the doctor owner has no real knowledge about how to do that effectively without expert help?

A “no” answer indicates you are quite comfortable about extracting from your medical career just enough abundance and satisfaction to make do. In other words, you are a hostage to your circumstances.

A “yes” answer indicates that you have not yet matured in business far enough to recognize that all of your sheer-brilliance in medical knowledge is never enough to create a maximally productive medical practice business-just enough to get by with for a while.

You have “educational burnout” without stroke rehabilitation even recognizing it. The evidence of this is obvious when you consider these issues:

  • Why is it necessary to require doctors to complete CME hours for maintaining medical licensure?
  • Why is it compulsory to recertify for specialty credentialing?
  • Why is it that once you start medical practice there is no urgency or self-implied obligation to voluntarily maintain and continually update your medical knowledge?
  • Why is it that the need to have a business education is such an unnecessary and objectionable necessity that is totally ignored by most doctors? Yes, you promised yourself there would be no more burning the midnight oil again.

What possible reason would medical education pundits have to neglect the need to provide a business as well as medical education to medical students? Could it be that they knew about the educational burnout phenomenon and didn’t want that to happen during your medical education and training? But was it OK if it came afterwords?

Your passion for practicing medicine gradually becomes crowded out of your mind. That’s because once you become aware of the fact that your medical career is not able to provide you with the higher goals you had in mind at the start and turned out to be only a pipedream in reality.

For those doctors who already have wealth and adequate funding, there seems to be no real concern about these kinds of issues. However, for most doctors that is not the case. My concern is about the latter.

The real life examples of how these arcane factors are born:
The sequence of ominous changes in your passion for your medical career is one of the most distressing, yet understandable, factors leading to career failure. It begins with graduation from medical school, sometimes even sooner. It’s something older doctors see in their rear view mirror.

Prestige, recognition, fulfillment, happiness and expectations in your medical career seldom increase with time but rather fade with time. As you proceed in your medical career goal setting beyond medical school, the bright lights, celebrations and spectacular accomplishments disappear in the sunset. It starts almost immediately on entering your medical practice.